Don't Be In The Dark About Personal Bankruptcy

In the times of this less than stellar economy, more and more people are finding out what it means to be bankrupt. People who have worked all their lives to support themselves and their families have become surrounded by debt and lose all hope. Personal bankruptcy can be scary, but you can escape it, as you will see by reading the following article.



Individuals often seek to file for personal bankruptcy protection if their debts exceed their ability to repay them. If this is the case for you, you should begin to investigate the legislation in your state. Bankruptcy laws vary from state to state so it is important to do your research. In some states, your home is protected, while in others it is not. See to it that you understand the bankruptcy laws in the area that you live prior to filing.

In any personal bankruptcy filing, it is essential to make certain to list all elements of your financial life in your petition and other paperwork. Failing to include all income sources or omitting individual debts and accounts can lead to substantial problems down the road that can limit the dischargeability of some of your most substantial obligations.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, you do not need to lose your home, car or other items that you have loans for. If you wish to keep them, however, you must make the payments on a timely basis in order to avoid repossession. If the payments are too much to handle, your bankruptcy attorney may be able to arrange for an evaluation of your loan and negotiate a lower monthly payment. In the case of a home, you may look into a loan modification or refinance to reduce your payment amount.

Remember that certain kinds of debt won't be discharged even after you have filed for bankruptcy. If you have outstanding student loans, owe child or spousal support, a divorce settlement agreement, or unpaid taxes, you will still be liable for these debts. Also, if you forget to list certain debts on your court documents, you won't be able to add them in the future.

Know your rights when it comes to filing for personal bankruptcy. The last thing you need now, is a hassle from the legal professional that you hire to represent you. A few years ago, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act was made into law, in order to protect financially strapped consumers from being ripped off. Beware and be informed!

Locate an online support forum for those who have filed for bankruptcy. This way, you can ask other people questions and find out things that you may not know. There are a lot of forums on the internet, but there are also, some offline groups you can join, if you prefer being offline. Because these people know what you're going through, they can make you feel better about the situation.

Do some research. There are two main types of personal bankruptcy - Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. Chapter 7 will eliminate the majority of your debt while Chapter 13 restructures it to give you time to pay it off. Each one has different rules on what assets you are allowed to keep. So, ask a lot of questions before you decide which one is the best fit for your situation.

Never forget that you still deserve to enjoy life while you go through the bankruptcy process. The process of filing for bankruptcy can make people a nervous wreck. It is essential to cope with this stress well, to prevent becoming depressed. Things will be sunnier after you take positive steps to move forward.

It is still possible to get a mortgage or car loan, even if you are filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. It is more difficult. Normally, the trustee assigned to your bankruptcy must approve any new loan. It is important to make a budget and prove that you are able to afford the payment. You should also be prepared to explain why you need to purchase the item.

Keep in mind that, currently, student loans cannot be discharged when filing for bankruptcy. There is a process by which student loans could be considered dischargeable, but it is costly, difficult, and rarely successful. However, student loans in bankruptcy have been a topic discussed by Congress in recent years, so keep up with new bankruptcy laws to find out if any changes have been made.


You do not need to lose all your assets just because you file for bankruptcy. You can keep your personal property. This covers items such as clothing, jewelry, electronics and household furnishings. This depends on the laws in your state, the bankruptcy type for which you file, and your unique finance situation, but it may be possible to retain your home, car and other large assets.

Bankruptcy is something that is set up to help you. Do not think that your life is over because of bankruptcy. There will be some limitations to things that you can do, however, they are only temporary. There are also organizations out there that can help you get your life back in order after bankruptcy. If you filed or are thinking of filing, you should look into these organizations. There is https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/education-postsecondary/news/2018/01/24/445284/getting-private-collection-agencies-federal-student-loans/ .

Be aware that there are two kinds of bankruptcy. There is Chapter 7, and Chapter 13. Chapter 7 can keep the filer from paying debts entirely. This option is generally for those that have debts so high or income that is so low that, they cannot afford a payment plan. Chapter 13 lets the filer get a payment plan so that they can repay all, or parts of their debt between three and five years.

Research your state's bankruptcy laws before filing your petition. The code governing personal bankruptcy is a complex area that is subject to much misunderstanding. Some mistakes could lead to having your case dismissed. Before you go forward, make sure you thoroughly research personal bankruptcy. This will ensure your bankruptcy will go smoothly.

Continue to pay certain bills. Once you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you won't receive any more collection calls, and you may cease to receive certain bills. Remember that you are still under obligation to pay for your 'secured possessions', such as your home or vehicle, or you may lose them.

Do not drain your 401K or retirement plan, in order to use the funds to pay off debt before filing for bankruptcy. Those funds are protected, so you should hold onto them. If you need to, use them to keep up with the payments for the secured lines of credit on the things you plan to keep.

You should now be better prepared for the time before, during and after bankruptcy. The information that has been provided to you has been known to help many other debtors in the same situation that you are in. Use it to your benefit and make the right choices with such a big life choice.

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